Have you ever been at the dog park and seen two dogs get in a fight? Or heard of a dog that viciously attacked another dog “out of nowhere?” In reality, dogs give plenty of signs of fear or aggression before things escalate to a fight—signs that often go undetected or get overlooked.

Dogs obviously do not speak English but they do have their own communication cues that you as a pet parent are responsible for learning. Being in tune with your furry friend’s communication signals will help prevent problems and may even save your pet’s life—of the life of another pet your dog might attack.

You may know some classic cues, like raised hair on the back or baring teeth, but did you know hiding behind your legs is a problem, too?

*Note: this is NOT a paid endorsement. All opinions are our own.

Does your dog howl or hide when 4th of July fireworks go off? Does he cower when thunderstorms hit? Does he dread the car and even have accidents on car rides? Can he not stand when you leave his side and destroy things while you’re gone?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, the ThunderShirt might be for you.

yellow dog wearing a thundershirtWe’ve already detailed how the ThunderShirt works but if you’re planning on using the shirt for the first time this 4th of July, make sure you know how you should act when fireworks go off.

Did you know you shouldn’t yell at your dog for barking? ThunderShirt offers some training tips on their website to use with the shirt.

We also consulted The Pooch Coach, trainer Beverly Ulbrich, for tips on dealing with 4th of July noises. Here’s what she suggests:

By: Kyle McKay, Guest Writer

Everyone is unique. We each have our own likes, dislikes, personality and comfort zone.

Dogs also have these character traits but sometimes, it’s hard to remember that when meeting a dog for the first time.

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Sometimes dogs get spooked and need space from humans and/or other dogs. Usually a tail tuck or a dog hiding behind its owner are clues the dog needs space.

Some canine companions are incredibly friendly. They’ll run to you with a furiously wagging tail, practically begging you to pet them and play with them. This scenario is often a default expectation among most people when encountering an unfamiliar dog in public.

But it’s important to know this is not always the case. And even if your dog is friendly, that doesn’t mean every dog the two of your encounter will be, too.

Just like humans, some dogs need a little more space than what people expect. A dog may be a bit skittish and leery around new animals or people. But how do you know when this is the case?

We’ve been bringing you her expert tips here at Yellow Dog Blog and now our training expert is the official trainer of San Francisco USPS mail carriers on how to deal with aggressive dogs.

Beverly Ulbrich visited the main mail-sorting facility March 21 to lead two talks to a group of postal carriers before they headed out on their daily routes.

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Beverly talked about how fear is the driving force for why dogs attack.