Have you ever been at the dog park and seen two dogs get in a fight? Or heard of a dog that viciously attacked another dog “out of nowhere?” In reality, dogs give plenty of signs of fear or aggression before things escalate to a fight—signs that often go undetected or get overlooked.

Dogs obviously do not speak English but they do have their own communication cues that you as a pet parent are responsible for learning. Being in tune with your furry friend’s communication signals will help prevent problems and may even save your pet’s life—of the life of another pet your dog might attack.

You may know some classic cues, like raised hair on the back or baring teeth, but did you know hiding behind your legs is a problem, too?

Who can resist that squishy pug face? Or those stubby little doxie legs? How about those piercing blue Huskie eyes?

When choosing a dog for your family, there is so much more to consider than looks. Choosing your dog based solely on looks could be disastrous—if you choose a dog ill-suited for your lifestyle, he may end up in a shelter and your family heartbroken. So before you impulsively pick your new furry family member, make sure you take into account these four major issues.

Most pet parents are guilty of it at one point or another—babying your dog. Whether it’s extra cookies, carrying them around, dressing them up in cute outfits or just plain letting them get their way, we can treat our furry friends the way we would treat our toddlers. But could this be making a good dog go bad?

San Francisco based dog trainer Beverly Ulbrich is helping us outline the pros and cons of treating your dog like a child.

We’ve been bringing you her expert tips here at Yellow Dog Blog and now our training expert is the official trainer of San Francisco USPS mail carriers on how to deal with aggressive dogs.

Beverly Ulbrich visited the main mail-sorting facility March 21 to lead two talks to a group of postal carriers before they headed out on their daily routes.

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Beverly talked about how fear is the driving force for why dogs attack.

We saw a recent article on Yahoo! Shine detailing seven dog breeds that don’t deserve their stereotype and really wanted to share it. We couldn’t agree more! Properly training your dog, regardless of breed, is the single most important thing owners can do to make sure he grows up without any behavioral issues.

We consulted our expert trainer Beverly Ulbrich, founder of The Pooch Coach, to help further debunk these breed stereotypes. She told us any dog can be fearful and aggressive.

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American Pit Bull Terrier by Scott Kinmartin, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

“All dogs need to be properly socialized and trained so they are not fearful, which almost always leads into aggression,” Ulbrich says. “Dogs need to learn boundaries and have bite inhibition. They should be taught not to growl or snap when upset.”

She also emphasizes dogs should be treated as individuals and it isn’t fair to make general assumptions about a breed.

“I don’t like spearking in generalities about breed,” Ulbrich says. “Breeds are like nationalities for people; they might look similar, but personalities and disorders vary greatly.”